Results 1 - 30 of 40
Project Persons Year Tags
Aeolia (Nottingham Trent University ) body, protoype, three-dimensional, weaving
This project explores the nature of space and place and will examine the concept of a bodily connection with the land through sketch prototyping of stretch sensors in sculptural textile forms. The resulting series of woven pieces for the body will be remotely connected to three-dimensional forms in the Scottish landscape, combining information from each to create unique low frequency feedback to be experienced by the wearer. this project is a collaboration between many people from different disciplines, most of them working at Nottingham Trent University.
Auger Loizeau James Auger, Jimmy Loizeau (Auger Loizeau) project, critical, body
James Auger and Jimmy Loizeau have been collaborating on projects since the concept of the Audio Tooth Implant was first conceived in October 2000. Industrial Design heretofore has mostly been concerned with the process of bringing products to market, making them desirable and therefore saleable. With a slight sideways step: removing the commercial aspect from the requirements of the object, it can adopt a whole different agenda, questioning the process that gives birth to it rather than blindly conforming to it. In this way design can comment on consumer culture, the role of products and the ubiquity and function of technology. It becomes a tool for questioning rather than problem solving. Through the development and dissemination of speculative and critical products and services we hope to instigate a broader analysis of what it means to exist in a technology rich environment both today and in the near future.
Bare Conductive ink Roger Ashby, Matt Johnson, Isabel Lizardi, Rafat Malik, Bibi Nelson, Becky Pilditch applied by brush stamp or spray, movement and touch, gesture, interaction, custom electronic circuitry, skin, conductive, ink, new material, non-toxic, temporary, performance, computer interfaces, non invasive technology, body
Bare is a conductive ink that is applied directly onto the skin allowing the creation of custom electronic circuitry. This innovative material allows users to interact with electronics through gesture, movement, and touch. Bare can be applied with a brush, stamp or spray and is non-toxic and temporary. Application areas include dance, music, computer interfaces, communication and medical devices. Bare is an intuitive and non-invasive technology which will allow users to bridge the gap between electronics and the body
Body Pixel Deborah Hustic technology, interviews, wearable, blog, artist, beta
Deborah Hustic aka body pixel – artist, blogger, web dreamer… working with analogue and digital media. Holds MA in Comparative Literature and Ethnology, thesis on the topic of Butoh. Trained in graphic design; workshops in the fields of photography, dance, computer arts, semantic web, podcasts, textile arts, dance criticism, wearable technology, etc. For 15 years involved in new media. Interested in interactive performance and motion, wearable technology and the usage of new media art in performative context, DIY and free culture movement.
CO2rset Kristin O'Friel 2008 designer, artist, urbanist, environmentalist, everyday interactions, sustainable practices, physical interfaces, couture, CO2 levels, CO2 Sensors, Mini Gear Motors, Microcontroller, H-bridge, Cotton Fabric, Webbing, Boning, Grommets, Lacing, garment
CO2RSET is couture that monitors CO2 levels in the atmosphere and responds by tightening or loosening on the body.
Crafting the wearable computer: design process and user experience Sarah Kettley craft, making, thesis, book
Doctoral thesis on craft, design, wearable computing, female friendship groups and meaning making. Methodology and analysis tools for desgning innovative products. This volume contains the main body of the thesis with abstract, chapters, references and appendices. Volume 2 is the published papers only.
Danielle Wilde Danielle Wilde researcher, performance, fashion, fine art, critical, interaction design
Artist and design researcher at Monash University Faculty of Art and Design (Melbourne, Australia) and the CSIRO Division of Materials Science and Engineering (Belmont, Australia). Undertaking practice-based doctoral research, investigating how technology might be paired with the body to poeticise experience, and what this might mean. Research sits at the nexus of performance, fashion, fine art, critical (technology) and interaction design.
Digital Skins Body Atmospheres Nancy Tilbury future visions of clothing, wearable tech
Studio Nancy Tilbury is launching a new website Studio Nancy Tilbury is also part of the formation of a new innovative fashioning technology brand called Studio_XO
Elisabeth de Senneville Elisabeth de Senneville fashion, future
While de Senneville had hoped her clothes would have relevance in the 21st century, she was right on target. In 2001 the futuristic designer met the future head on and created clothing with New Age accoutrements. As Scott Lafee of New Scientist (24 February 2001) remarked, "Clothing of the future will be smart, so smart it will organize your day." The de Senneville take on such a proposition was designing dresses with built-in microcapsules with a variety of substances from heat-sensitive dyes (that vary color with body temperature), sunscreen or fragrance. In addition, according to Lafee, While such creations may not be everyone's cup of tea, de Senneville most definitely represents the future of fashion designing.
Extreme Beauty: The Body Transformed Harold Koda 2001 clothing, accessories, body, anthropology, sociology, art, history, book, haute couture, body, beautiful
Throughout history, humans have used clothing and accessories to lift, squeeze, frame and pad the body. In Extreme Beauty: The Body Transformed, Harold Koda deftly weaves anthropology, sociology, art history, and haute couture into a lively survey of shifting notions of the body beautiful. Divided into five sections
ISWC (ISWC 2010) 2010 fashion designers, product vendors, researchers, mobile technologies, on-body, wearables computers, wearable computing, meeting, conference, symposium, textile manufactures, users, share information
ISWC'10, the fourteenth annual IEEE International Symposium on Wearable Computers, is the premier forum for wearable computing and issues related to on-body and worn mobile technologies. ISWC'10 will bring together researchers, product vendors, fashion designers, textile manufacturers, users, and related professionals to share information and advances in wearable computing. ISWC'10 explicitly aims to broaden its scope to include cell phones and cell phone applications as they have become the most successful wearable computer to date.
Jane Harris jane harris body scanning, 3D CG animation, CGI animation, designer, textile, artist, motion capture
Practitioner Jane Harris builds on her knowledge of materials and works digitally with advanced computer media to create representations of fluid, three-dimensional forms – the clothed and moving body in space.
Johnny Holland Jeroen van Geel collective, creatives, share, interactions, learn, experience, design
Johnny Holland is an open collective of creatives who want to share and learn from each other. Everybody who wants to share something about the interactions of experience design is invited to join. Below you find a list of all the Johnnies that are currently involved.
LoVid Tali Hinkis, Kyle Lapidus patchworks, digital prints, sculptures, live video installations, artist, interdisciplinary, media projects, performances, video recordings
LoVid is an interdisciplinary artist duo composed of Tali Hinkis and Kyle Lapidus. Our work includes live video installations, sculptures, digital prints, patchworks, media projects, performances, and video recordings. We combine many opposing elements in our work, contrasting hard electronics with soft patchworks, analog and digital, or handmade and machine produced objects. This multidirectional approach is also reflected in the content of our work: romantic and aggressive, wireless and wire-full. We are interested in the ways in which the human body and mind observe, process, and respond to both natural and technological environments, and in the preservation of data, signals, and memory.
Lucy McRae Lucy McRae designer, wearable technology, interaction design, artist, art
Lucy McRae straddles the world of fashion, technology and the body. Trained as a classical ballerina and architect her work inherently fascinates with the human body.
Material Beliefs (Interaction research Studio, Department of Design at Goldsmiths, University of London) biomedical, cybernetic, public space, body, Goldsmiths
Material Beliefs takes emerging biomedical and cybernetic technology out of labs and into public spaces. The project focuses on technologies which blur the boundaries between our bodies and materials, and how design as a tool for public engagement can be used to stimulate discussion about the value of these forms of hybridity
Medulla Intimata Tina Gonsalves, Tom Donaldson 2004 public intervention, ewellery, fashion, performance, bio-metrics, technology, moving image
MEDULLA INTIMATA is a hybrid new media work mixing public intervention with jewellery, fashion, performance, bio-metrics, technology and moving image. It is a collaboration between award winning Australian video and installation artist Tina Gonsalves , and London based artist/engineer, Tom Donaldson. MEDULLA INTIMATA is a necklace that contains a video screen and biometric sensors. The sensors (using analysis of speech and tonal range of conversaton) monitor the wearer's emotions to guide real-time video-generation that evokes a sense of seeing beneath the surface of the skin, exposing the emotional and physical inner body. Video is displayed on the screen embedded in the jewellery.
Minty Monkey Elise Co technology and computation fashion design, fashion, design, technology, computer science, designer, body expression, communication, new garment, beautiful
Elise developed interests in computer science and technology alongside her architectural training; this simultaneous focus on design and computation led her to the ACG. As a PhD student, Elise's particular interest is in fashion, and in the ways that technology and computation can expand the notions of fashion, relationships to the body, expression, and communication. This involves creating new garment paradigms, not of "wearable computing" cyborgs, but of carefully-designed pieces that are responsive, reconfigurable, and beautiful.
MIThril Human Design (MIT Media Lab) MIT, platform, research, wearables, human computer interaction
MIThril is a next-generation wearables research platform developed by researchers at the MIT Media Lab. The goal of the MIThril project is the development and prototyping of new techniques of human-computer interaction for body-worn applications. Through the application of human factors, machine learning, hardware engineering, and software engineering, the MIThril team is constructing a new kind of computing environment and developing prototype applications for health, communications, and just-in-time information delivery
Motion Response Sportswear Kerri Wallace designer, thermo-chromic liquid crystals, research, new material, printed textiles, fashion sportwear, smart media, smart printing processes, textile, smart wearable garments, clothing, responsive technology, thermo chromic ink, leucodye microcapsules, color changing
Kerri is a textile designer from the United Kingdom currently challenging the potential of wearable display technologies in textile design. Prior to her MA in Design for Textile Futures, Kerri graduated from Chelsea College of Art & Design in BA Textiles, 2005 where she specialised in recycled materials for the body and home, and sustainable solutions for interior and exterior spaces. This exploration included textile manipulation and mixed media approaches, printed techniques, and a related written paper. Kerri is both a conscientious and dynamic designer whos skills include silk-screen and digital print design, constructed textiles, fine art and communication design.
No-Contact Jacket Adam Whiton, Yolita Nugent 2006 pain, high voltage, exo-electric, electic current pulses, 80.000 volts, activated by the wearer, protection from violence, women, jacket, garment, non-lethal, critical life saving
The No-Contact Jacket is a wearable defensive jacket created to aid women in their struggle for protection from violence. When activated by the wearer, 80,000 volts of low amperage electric current pulses just below the surface shell of the entire jacket. This exo-electric armor prevents any person from unauthorized contact with the wearer's body. If an assailant were to grab hold of the wearer the high voltage exterior would interrupt their neurological impulses which control voluntary muscle movement. The neuromuscular system would be overwhelmed causing disorientation and loss of balance to occur and of course pain. The pain experienced is non-lethal but is enough to effectively and immediately deter contact with the wearer and provide a critical life saving oppurtunity for escape.
Parasite Sonali Sridhar & Mouna Andraos illumination, jacket, print, graphic
A jacket with a printed pattern that is almost seamless when not active and comes to live through the illumination of the different graphical that compose it. The pattern, like a parasite or a wine plant, grows on the structure of the body as time passes until it grows into a fully blooming visual organism. When the jacket is removed, the organism slowly dies out until it disappears completely.
Piezing Dress, Muk Luk Flux Amanda Parkes 2008 mechanisms for working prototypes of Tangible User Interfaces, electronics, developing software, Human-Computer Interaction, journals, conferences, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer programming, students, hard-working, technically competent, creative, interactions, digital information, surfaces, physical objects, designing human interfaces, Tangible Bits vision, electrical /mechanical engineering skills, design aesthetics, installations, video performance, wearable technology, creativity
-Amanda Parkes' Piezing generates power using the natural gestures of the human body in motion. Around the joints of the elbows and hips of the garment is piezoelectric material that generates electricity in response to applied mechanical stress. The electricity is then stored as voltage in a centralized small battery and later can be discharged for use. - Muk Lux Flux boots change shape depending on the speed and motion of the wearer.
Popkalab Ricardo Nascimento artist, multimedia, body, environment
Ricardo Nascimento,1977. He works as artist, multimedia developer and producer. He investigates body-environment relations focusing interface development and autonomous adaptative systems for interactive installations and hybrid environments.
re: skin Mary Flanagan 2002 skin, book, publication, body, technology, vision
In re: skin, scholars, essayists and short story writers offer their perspectives on skin's boundary and surface, as metaphor and physical reality. The twenty-first century and its attendant technology call for a new investigation of the intersection of body, skin, and technology. These cutting-edge writings address themes of skin and bodily transformation in an era in which we are able not only to modify our own skins by plastic surgery, tattooing, skin graft art, and other methods but to cross skins, merging with other bodies or colonizing multiple bodies.
see yourself sensing Madeline Schwartzman book, art, senses, perception
Black Dog Publishing. Exploring this concept through the last 50 years of contemporary art and design, See Yourself Sensing: Redefining Human Perception examines the work of key practitioners in this field, from Rebecca Horn’s object based installations, Stelarc’s robotic body extensions to Carsten Höllers’ physically interactive sculptures. The works and artists illustrated throws into consideration how we see and sense the world around us through artistic interpretation. Whether extending these senses through projections, technological spectacles or even telepathy, our perceptual limitations are challenged and our senses realized visually. Analyzing the importance and influence of body-scaled sensory experiments, Schwartzman reveals the fascinating relationship between senses, body, art and perception.
sensoree Kristin Neidlinger 2011 - ongoing tech lab, smart textiles, future fabric
SENSOREE is an art and technology design lab elaborating on ideas of therapeutic, body architecture, interactive installations, sensitive technology, and robot clothes. SENSOREE designs future fabric and smart textiles for wearable technology and interactive installations. Our whimsical designs create external nervous systems that inspire body awareness, insight, and spontaneity. We promote extimacy – externalized intimacy. SENSOREE explores for the Sensory Computer Interface [SCI] — the investigation of proximity, intimacy, telepathy, intuition, and humor between human and machine. It’s a sensory soiree !
Sleep Suit Forrest Jessee 2006 visionary, eva foam, coccoon, feelings of connected and disconnectedness, human body, personal space, designer, concept, product, personal, sleep
The project attempts to challenge the idea of personal space in relationship to the human body and its surrounding environment. The structure of the material, a structural pleat, is used as a means to create feelings of connected and disconnectedness as well as provide varying levels of support for different parts of the body. By thinking of the cut pattern as sections of the body, the structure can act as a semi-permeable outer skin.
slimavocado Kristin Neidlinger enhanced bodies, artist, wearable, sensors
Kristin Neidlinger aka Slim Avocado is an experience designer focused on the Sensory Computer Interface [SCI]. She aspires to craft phenomenal technology to enhance and expand physical embodiment. kristin is a classically trained ballerina with a background in physical therapies and holds an MFA in Interactive Design. Currently, she works with a team of artists and engineers at SENSOREE an art tech design lab creating therapeutic, body architecture, sensitive technology, interactive installations, and robot clothes.
Smart Products (Estonian Academy of Arts ) school, art, academy
We live in remarkable time, often not taking note of what is happening around us, and how much it is changing while we watch. Digitalisation, the quiet infi ltration of artifi cial intelligence into everyday objects and our environment is one of the most substantial changes which appears to be quite natural. Things become smart ñ smart home, smart door, smart toothbrushÖ This smartness is generally perceived as the ability of objects to evaluate the environment and what is going on there realistically and to guide processes, if need arises ñ be it textile which responds to our body heat and adjusts its structure accordingly, or an airport concourse which delicately and personallyguides us to the right place according to the ticket in our pocket.