Results 1 - 30 of 43
Project Persons Year Tags
12th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services (Faculdade de CiÍncias da Universidade de Lisboa ) conference, forum, human computer interaction
from September 7th-10th 2010 The MobileHCI series provides a forum for academics and practitioners to discuss the challenges and potential solutions for effective interaction with mobile devices and services. It covers the design, evaluation and application of techniques and approaches for all mobile and wearable computing devices and services.
Air Guitar (CSIRO) motion, sensor, textile, audio
The air guitar works by recognising and interpreting arm movements and relaying this wirelessly to a computer for audio generation. There are no trailing cables to get in way or trip over. Textile motion sensors embedded in the shirt sleeves detect motion when the arm bends - in most cases the left arm chooses a note and the right arm plays it.
Ayah Bdeir Ayah Bdeir artist, engineer, designer, researcher
Ayah Bdeir is an artist, engineer and interaction designer. She graduated from the MIT Media Lab with a Masters of Media Arts and Sciences after studying Computer & Communication Engineering and Sociology in the American University of Beirut. She has worked as a researcher and interaction designer in Lebanon and New York, in artist spaces and design firms, with a brief interruption to work in a financial services firm in New York.
Bare Conductive ink Roger Ashby, Matt Johnson, Isabel Lizardi, Rafat Malik, Bibi Nelson, Becky Pilditch applied by brush stamp or spray, movement and touch, gesture, interaction, custom electronic circuitry, skin, conductive, ink, new material, non-toxic, temporary, performance, computer interfaces, non invasive technology, body
Bare is a conductive ink that is applied directly onto the skin allowing the creation of custom electronic circuitry. This innovative material allows users to interact with electronics through gesture, movement, and touch. Bare can be applied with a brush, stamp or spray and is non-toxic and temporary. Application areas include dance, music, computer interfaces, communication and medical devices. Bare is an intuitive and non-invasive technology which will allow users to bridge the gap between electronics and the body
Body Pixel Deborah Hustic technology, interviews, wearable, blog, artist, beta
Deborah Hustic aka body pixel – artist, blogger, web dreamer… working with analogue and digital media. Holds MA in Comparative Literature and Ethnology, thesis on the topic of Butoh. Trained in graphic design; workshops in the fields of photography, dance, computer arts, semantic web, podcasts, textile arts, dance criticism, wearable technology, etc. For 15 years involved in new media. Interested in interactive performance and motion, wearable technology and the usage of new media art in performative context, DIY and free culture movement.
CHI 2010 (CHI 2010) 2010 human experience, human computer interaction, computing systems, human factors, conference, community
CHI (ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems) is the premier international conference for the field of human-computer interaction. CHI 2010 looks outward to the human experience of computing in the world. ìWe are HCIî challenges our community to embrace the diversity of HCI in the world and to exclaim our commitment as a profession to empower people from all walks of life. 10-15 April 2010 Atlanta, GA, USA
Coded Chromics Lynsey Calder, Sara Robertson, Ruth Aylett, Sandy Louchart computer science, design, smart textiles, coding, blog, university, color changing
Lynsey Calder, Sara Robertson, Ruth Aylett and Sandy Louchart are a multi-disciplinary research team at Heriot-Watt University bringing together Smart Textile Design and Computer Science. Intelligent colour changing textiles integrated with computer science and electronics
Computer Science Department (University of Colorado) computer, science, university
The Computer Science Department currently has 36 faculty, 180 graduate students (98 masters students and 82 PhD students), 258 undergraduate majors, 52 undergraduate minors, and 11 research and administrative staff. It has strong research programs in computer architecture, operating systems, networking, mobile computing, computer security, computational biology, robotics, algorithm design, artificial intelligence, software and web engineering, programming languages, database design and data mining, human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, machine learning, lifelong learning and design, numerical and parallel computation, speech and language processing, scientific computing and theoretical computer science.
Crafting the wearable computer: design process and user experience Sarah Kettley craft, making, thesis, book
Doctoral thesis on craft, design, wearable computing, female friendship groups and meaning making. Methodology and analysis tools for desgning innovative products. This volume contains the main body of the thesis with abstract, chapters, references and appendices. Volume 2 is the published papers only.
Electronic Textiles: Wearable Computers, Reactive Fashion, and Soft Computation Joanna Berzowska (Xs Lab) 2004 electronic, textiles, smart fabrics, fashionable
Electronic textiles, also referred to as smart fabrics, are quite fashionable right now. Their close relationship with the field of computer wearables gives us many diverging research directions and possible definitions.
Fab Lab (MIT) 2006 computer controlled tools, MIT, concepts, technological art, DIY, fashionable technology, wearable, workshop, design tools, circuits and microcontrollers, 3D Printing and Scanning Machines
A Fab Lab (fabrication laboratory) is a small-scale workshop with an array of computer controlled tools that cover several different length scales and various materials, with the aim to make "almost anything". This includes technology-enabled products generally perceived as limited to mass production. While Fab Labs have yet to compete with mass production and its associated economies of scale in fabricating widely distributed products, they have already shown the potential to empower individuals to create smart devices for themselves. These devices can be tailored to local or personal needs in ways that are not practical or economical using mass production.
Fibonacci Scarf Diana Eng fibonacci, scarf, knitting, patterns
This scarf is knit with the Fibonacci number pattern. Famous in the mathematics world, the Fibonacci number pattern is created by adding a number to the previous number: 0,1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34… (2 comes from adding 1 + 1, 3 comes from adding 2 + 1). This is no ordinary number sequence. The Fibonacci number patterns are found in nature in the seed placement of a sunflower, the pattern on a pine cone, and the uncurling of a fern. The number pattern creates a golden spiral and is used in financial predictions and for computer algorithms. This scarf is knit with the Fibonacci numbers in order: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, and 21. As the scarf is knit, the new number of stitches is added to the previous number of stitches to get the next number of stitches. Thus the knitting method is also influence by the Fibonacci formula.
Futurelab (Futurelab) institute, art, society
Futurelab is work to date covers a range of both topical and forward-thinking areas including, among others, curriculum innovation; learning spaces and building capital programmes; digital inclusion; health and well-being; play and computer games; adult and family learning; assessment; and digital literacy and participation.
Hysterical Bubble Anja Hertenberger photo, drawing, man-machine interaction, control, power, surveillance, identity with media, performance, installations, video-collages, artist, video, computer, programming, electronic, embroidery
Lives and works in Amsterdam, Netherlands.In her video-collages, installations and performances she is researching identity in relation to media, surveillance, power, control and man-machine interaction. She works in different media like drawing, photo, video, computer programming, electronic and embroidery.
ISWC (ISWC 2010) 2010 fashion designers, product vendors, researchers, mobile technologies, on-body, wearables computers, wearable computing, meeting, conference, symposium, textile manufactures, users, share information
ISWC'10, the fourteenth annual IEEE International Symposium on Wearable Computers, is the premier forum for wearable computing and issues related to on-body and worn mobile technologies. ISWC'10 will bring together researchers, product vendors, fashion designers, textile manufacturers, users, and related professionals to share information and advances in wearable computing. ISWC'10 explicitly aims to broaden its scope to include cell phones and cell phone applications as they have become the most successful wearable computer to date.
Jacket (Nyx Clothing) garment, computer controlled, wearable technology, style, fashion, jackets, apparel, clothing, LED, collaborations, performance, fun-loving experience, flexible panels, clubber, entertainent, sales representative, sound processor
Nyx Illuminated Clothing was founded in 2001 in Los Angeles, California USA. It now markets and sells illuminated clothing worldwide through this web-site and national representatives.Nyx jackets are the most jaw-dropping, fun-loving experience you are ever likely to have with an item of clothing. Ok, except for maybe lingerie. These jackets are internally wired with bright lights arranged on fully flexible panels that allow for text and graphics to dance across the surface of the garment, all computer controlled within the jacket. All you have to do is switch it on.
Jane Harris jane harris body scanning, 3D CG animation, CGI animation, designer, textile, artist, motion capture
Practitioner Jane Harris builds on her knowledge of materials and works digitally with advanced computer media to create representations of fluid, three-dimensional forms – the clothed and moving body in space.
Keyboard Trousers Erik De Nijs 2009 nerd, geek, fun, wireless, keyboard, garment, wearable, concept, young
Concept born with a combinations of two products, for create a new kind of product. The jeans have all the important computer stuff (like a mouse, keyboard and the speakers) in it. You didnít have to be stiff behind your screen, but you can move in any position you want because the keyboard would be in the same place.
Kickbee Corey Menscher 2009 wearable, interaction design, easy, fun, pregnant mother, Vibration sensors, product, fabric, confort, microcontroller, garment, kick, Twitter, family, message
The Kickbee is a stretchable band worn by a pregnant mother. Vibration sensors are attached directly to the band, and are triggered by movement underneath. The band and electronics are covered in a soft fabric cover for design and comfort. A microcontroller in the garment captures the movement and transmits the signals wirelessly to a computer running a custom application.
Laura Beloff Laura Beloff wearable objects, networked installations, artist
With acclaimed international reputation as an artist, the Finnish-born Laura Beloff's artistic works can be described as peculiar wearable objects, programmed structures and participatory, networked installations. In her pieces she combines technology fluently with various mediums ranging from video to textile, from sound to sculptural and organic materials. Many of her works deal with individuals in the global society trying to adapt to highly complex technologically enhanced world, which is becoming increasingly mobile. Collaboration with other artists, musicians and computer scientists has been one of the features typical for her working methods.
Marcelo Coelho Marcelo Coelho shape changing composites, paper computers, design, material science, human computer interaction, researcher, designer, interactive garments, edible circuits
Marcelo Coelho is a designer and researcher whose work dwells in the intersection of human-computer interaction, materials science and design. He is an inventor of paper computers, shape changing composites, interactive garments, and edible circuits.
Megan Lee Galbraith Megan Lee Galbraith (MIT Media Lab) computer science, wearable technology, graphic designer
I am an experienced graphic designer and computer programmer. My work spans the fields of mathematics, computer science, and the arts. I conduct research in wearable technology, computer interface design, interaction design, and web design.
Minty Monkey Elise Co technology and computation fashion design, fashion, design, technology, computer science, designer, body expression, communication, new garment, beautiful
Elise developed interests in computer science and technology alongside her architectural training; this simultaneous focus on design and computation led her to the ACG. As a PhD student, Elise's particular interest is in fashion, and in the ways that technology and computation can expand the notions of fashion, relationships to the body, expression, and communication. This involves creating new garment paradigms, not of "wearable computing" cyborgs, but of carefully-designed pieces that are responsive, reconfigurable, and beautiful.
MIThril Human Design (MIT Media Lab) MIT, platform, research, wearables, human computer interaction
MIThril is a next-generation wearables research platform developed by researchers at the MIT Media Lab. The goal of the MIThril project is the development and prototyping of new techniques of human-computer interaction for body-worn applications. Through the application of human factors, machine learning, hardware engineering, and software engineering, the MIThril team is constructing a new kind of computing environment and developing prototype applications for health, communications, and just-in-time information delivery
News Knitter Ebru Kurbak & Mahir Mustafa Yavuz data visualization, knitting, garments, computer, design
News Knitter is a data visualization project which focuses on knitted garments as an alternative medium to visualize large scale data. The production of knitted garments is a highly complex process which involves computer support at various steps starting with the designs of both the fabric and the shape of garments until they are ready-to-wear. In recent years, technical innovations in machine knitting have especially focused on the patterning facilities. The patterns are designed by individuals generally depending on the current trends of fashion and the intended target markets and multiplied through mass production. News Knitter translates this individual design process into a world-wide collaboration by utilizing live data streams as a base for pattern generation. Due to the dynamic nature of live data streams, the system generates patterns with unpredictable visuality.
OSLOOM Margarita Benitez (open source jacquard loom) ongoing DIY, affordable, open source loom, weaving
OSLOOM (short for OPEN SOURCE LOOM) is a project aimed at creating an open source electromechanical thread-controlled floor loom that will be computer controlled. A loom is a device used to weave fabric. The loom itself will be a Jacquard style loom. Jacquard looms allow for the individual control of each thread which in turn allows for photographic imagery to be woven. Jacquard looms like this exist commercially but they are very expensive (upwards of $30,000) which puts them out of reach for individuals and small educational facilities.
Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers Tom Igoe, Dan O'Sullivan 2004 theory, book
The computer revolution has made it easy for people with little to no technical training to use a computer for such everyday tasks as typing a letter, saving files, or recording data. But what about more imaginative purposes such as starting your car, opening a door, or tracking the contents of your refrigerator? "Physical Computing" will not only change the way you use your computer, it will change the way you think about your computeróhow you view its capabilities, how you interact with it, and how you put it to work for you. Itís time to bridge the gap between the physical and the virtualótime to use more than just your fingers to interact with your computer. Step outside of the confines of the basic computer and into the broader world of computing.
Piezing Dress, Muk Luk Flux Amanda Parkes 2008 mechanisms for working prototypes of Tangible User Interfaces, electronics, developing software, Human-Computer Interaction, journals, conferences, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer programming, students, hard-working, technically competent, creative, interactions, digital information, surfaces, physical objects, designing human interfaces, Tangible Bits vision, electrical /mechanical engineering skills, design aesthetics, installations, video performance, wearable technology, creativity
-Amanda Parkes' Piezing generates power using the natural gestures of the human body in motion. Around the joints of the elbows and hips of the garment is piezoelectric material that generates electricity in response to applied mechanical stress. The electricity is then stored as voltage in a centralized small battery and later can be discharged for use. - Muk Lux Flux boots change shape depending on the speed and motion of the wearer.
Processing Ben Fry, Casey Reas (Processing) 2001 online, community, programming language, visual arts
Processing is a programming language, development environment, and online community that since 2001 has promoted software literacy within the visual arts. Initially created to serve as a software sketchbook and to teach fundamentals of computer programming within a visual context, Processing quickly developed into a tool for creating finished professional work as well.
Re:live Leonardo/ISAST 2006 performance, nano arts, computer science, architecture, anthropology, virtual art, media art history, conference, photography, pop culture, visual culture
The event follows the success of the two previous Media Art History conferences, re:fresh (Banff 2005) and re:place (Berlin 2007). The conference series is supported by the Database of Virtual Art and Leonardo/ISAST (International Society for Art, Science and Technology) whose International Advisory Committee will publicise the event and referee papers.